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Hawai'i Powered - Clean Energy for Hawai'i, by Hawai'i

Welcome to the online participation site!

This is the online hub for community involvement in Hawaiian Electric's plan for a clean energy future. Looking for Integrated Grid Planning documents?

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Plugged In

Hawaii Powered News & Updates View all posts

Renewable Energy Zones Interactive Map

Help identify potential project locations.

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Inputs & Assumptions Data Dashboard

Watch this intro video to learn more!

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Oct. 24, 2022 Koolauloa Moku (Waimea-Kaaawa) https://youtu.be/pMVq69nNZq8
Oct. 26, 2022 Waianae Moku (Nanakuli – Keawaula) https://youtu.be/bH22x65sg3g
Nov. 1, 2022 Kona Moku (Moanalua – East Honolulu) https://youtu.be/m1gqJTgUXJE
Nov. 3, 2022 Waialua Moku (Kaena – Kapaeloa) https://youtu.be/tu1ib5r5Hk0
Nov. 15, 2022 Koolaupoko Moku (Waimanalo – Kualoa) https://youtu.be/URZkwCQCggc
Nov. 17, 2022 Ewa Moku (Honouliuli – Halawa) https://youtu.be/FXPboTDyPRA

Vision and Goals

A Sustainable Hawaii

At Hawaiian Electric, our top priority is building a sustainable Hawaii in which our children and grandchildren, communities, customers and employees will thrive together.

Climate Change Action Plan

In 2021, Hawaiian Electric announced a bold Climate Change Action Plan centered on reducing carbon emissions as much as 70% by 2030 compared to 2005 levels and reaching net zero carbon emissions by 2045.

Reducing carbon emissions by more than two-thirds over this decade will be a stretch. We know it's achievable, and if everyone pitches in, we'll create a cost-effective, sustainable and resilient energy system for future generations.

Clean Energy Goals

A key strategy to reach net zero emissions is generating our energy from clean, renewable sources. As an island state, we can't rely on importing clean energy from neighboring states. Fortunately, Hawaii has an abundance of renewable resources that can power a resilient grid.

Clean Energy Vision

“Hawaii Powered” is our vision for using 100% local, clean energy. It celebrates finding solutions for a clean energy future right here in Hawaii. Clean energy for Hawaii, by Hawaii:

Achieves energy independence

Expands energy choices

Supports our Climate Change Action Plan and decarbonization goals

Some of the ways we'll get there:

Retiring and reducing use of fossil-fueled generating units


Using more grid-scale and customer-owned energy storage solutions


Expanding geothermal resources


Adding at least 1 gigawatt of clean energy projects (including community-based shared solar projects)


Creating customer programs that incentivize the use of clean, lower-cost energy

How will this transition affect community members?

Creating a clean energy future will shape our lives on individual, community and statewide levels. No matter where you live on the islands, you will likely experience changes that come with transitioning to 100% local, clean energy.

Customers

As a customer, you'll start seeing more energy choices and programs to incentivize the use of clean energy. You'll also have opportunities to share feedback with us that will help inform our customer programs and initiatives.

Communities

In your community, you may see more solar panels on rooftops, more community-based renewable projects, and development of new grid infrastructure. You'll see opportunities to share insights to help us identify and develop projects and create a more equitable clean energy future.

Statewide

On a statewide level, it will take collective and sustained action to cut carbon emissions across the economy. This includes transportation, agriculture, shipping, manufacturing and tourism—in other words, every sector can contribute to decarbonization of our state.

Clean Energy Today

Hawaiian Electric has the privilege of serving as the largest power utility in the state, providing electricity for 95% of residents on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Hawaii Island.

In 2021, about 38% of Hawaiian Electric's energy sales came from renewable sources. This means we have nearly quadrupled the amount of renewable energy since 2010, when under 10% of electricity sales came from renewables. We're proud of the progress we've made, but we still have a long way to go. There are many existing and planned facilities to generate clean energy across the islands. See maps of existing and planned facilities in our 2020-2021 Sustainability Report.

A resilient clean energy grid is diverse and balanced. Relying on a single source of energy makes us more vulnerable to energy markets, unexpected events and natural changes in energy sources (for example, days when tradewinds slow down or the sun is not shining). Integrating diverse energy sources and technologies:

  • Expands our energy options
  • Helps us adapt to evolving energy needs
  • Makes it easier to bounce back from unexpected events like earthquakes or storms
  • Provides more reliable power and predictable pricing for customers

Where does Hawaiian Electric's renewable energy come from?

Our renewable energy comes from many local sources with wide-ranging technologies. Click below to learn about the types of clean energy we use today.

Wind

The motion of the wind is captured and converted to electricity by turbine generators. Many wind turbines grouped together are called a wind farm. Hawaiian Electric is considering both on-island and offshore wind options, as well as strategies to plan for natural fluctuations in wind, ensuring a more stable and predictable energy stream.

8.5% of the RPS comes from wind

Path to Hawaii Powered

Integrated Grid Planning

Our work to move toward a Hawaii Powered future is guided by a process called Integrated Grid Planning, or “IGP.” This process brings many people together to build a resilient and reliable grid from local, renewable energy sources with various technologies and scales.

In this context, resilience means adapting to social, environmental, economic and technological changes to meet current and future energy needs.

Looking for Integrated Grid Planning documents?

Planning Process Timeline

We are currently developing the plan for putting together Hawaii's clean energy grid. This work includes considering potential future locations for clean energy projects and grid infrastructure. Throughout the planning process, we will provide information about our progress and invite community members and stakeholders to get involved and share input.

Learn more about IGP accomplishments and upcoming work in the graphic below, also available as a PDF.

High-level schedule graphic, showing the current location in the Plan Definition phase.

Key Considerations

Planning for a clean energy future is not as simple as unplugging from fossil fuels and plugging into renewables like solar and wind. There are many other factors we must consider that are related to the types of clean energy we invest in. These key considerations include time, affordability, land use, community and resilience/reliability.

Planning Challenges

Our challenge is to create a clean energy grid that stays on track with the state's timelines, stabilizes costs for customers, reduces conflicts with other land use priorities, minimizes impacts to communities and improves our overall energy resilience.

This is challenging because these factors are sometimes in conflict—for example, some energy projects would keep costs more consistent, but would also have greater impacts on communities.

Together with our stakeholder groups and community members, we work to prioritize, consider and connect these many factors.

Time

How long will it take to come online?

Affordability

What will it cost to design, build and maintain?

Land Use

What is the footprint? How does this affect other land use priorities?

Community

How will it affect neighbors, jobs and the environment?

Resilience and Reliability

Will it hold up to a natural disaster and can it bounce back? How will it meet future energy demands based on electric vehicles, solar projects, population and more? 


Updates by Island

Hawaiian Electric currently has four Requests for Proposals (RFPs) to identify new opportunities for renewable energy projects on Hawaii Island. RFPs are part of a competitive bidding process where we seek proposals from developers to deliver specific energy projects. RFPs are related to “Expressions of Interest,” which is an earlier step where we ask the developer community for feedback to learn more about different technologies and opportunities for potential projects. Learn about upcoming renewable energy projects.

Since March, we've been reaching out to communities around the island to provide updates on current and upcoming renewable energy projects on Hawaii Island. Our team, along with Hawaii Energy, also participates in the County of Hawaii's island wide Community Informational Sessions to share information about renewable energy, electric bills, energy efficiency, and energy conservation. Learn how you can take action now to save energy, money and the environment.

Like many utilities around the world, Hawaiian Electric is addressing evolving supply chain disruptions affecting some renewable energy projects. We're committed to working with our partners and communities to bring more lower cost renewable energy projects online to help stabilize costs for all customers.

We hope you'll join us in generating renewable energy! Learn how to participate in a community-based renewable energy project near you.

Hawaiian Electric recently released a draft Request for Proposals (RFP) to identify new opportunities for renewable energy projects on Maui. RFPs are part of a competitive bidding process where we seek proposals from developers to deliver specific energy projects. RFPs are related to “Expressions of Interest,” which is an earlier step where we ask the developer community for feedback to learn more about different technologies and opportunities for potential projects. Learn about upcoming renewable energy projects.

Like many utilities around the world, the Hawaiian Electric team is working to address evolving supply chain issues affecting generation and renewable energy projects. We understand that these delays affect customer bills and we're working to stabilize costs. This is an “all-hands on deck” effort that involves partnering with government agencies, community-based organizations and other energy providers to identify generation solutions, help customers manage costs and promote energy efficiency. Learn how you can take action now to save energy, money and the environment.

Maui customers can participate in shared solar programs administered by Hawaiian Electric. We hope you'll join us in generating renewable energy! Learn how to participate in a community-based renewable energy project near you.

Like many utilities around the world, the Hawaiian Electric team is adapting to evolving supply chain issues affecting generation and renewable energy projects. We understand that these delays affect customer bills and we're working to stabilize costs by entering power purchase agreements, or PPAs, with renewable energy providers. The more renewable energy that comes online, the less we're dependent on imported oil and tied to the price fluctuations associated with fossil fuels. Resilience and reliability are critical as the lights need to stay on. This is an “all-hands on deck” effort that involves partnering with government agencies, community-based organizations and other energy providers to identify generation solutions, help customers manage costs and promote energy efficiency. Learn how you can take action now to save energy, money and the environment.

Oahu customers will soon be able to participate in shared solar programs administered by Hawaiian Electric. We hope you'll join us in generating renewable energy! Learn more about shared solar, the latest phase of community-based renewable energy.

Hawaiian Electric currently has four Requests for Proposals (RFPs) to identify new opportunities for renewable energy projects on Oahu. In February, we filed a draft of a renewable firm generation RFP specifically for Oahu. To streamline our energy procurement efforts, Hawaiian Electric combined that RFP with a new RFP for renewable, dispatchable generation on Oahu. RFPs are part of a competitive bidding process where we seek proposals from developers to deliver specific energy projects. Learn about upcoming renewable energy projects.

Visit the ETIPP and Microgrids webpage to explore an energy opportunity in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy.

The Hawaiian Electric team recently announced its selection of a developer to build and maintain the largest renewable energy project and the first to offer the shared solar program on the island. The company is now in contract negotiations with DG Development & Acquisition, LLC and once a contract is finalized for the Lanai Solar project, it will be submitted to the PUC for approval. Much of our grid planning work on Lanai is happening in collaboration with the majority landowner on the island. Hawaiian Electric is seeking a developer to build and maintain the largest renewable energy project and the first to offer the shared solar program on the island. We look forward to adding more renewables on Lanai to move forward with the transition to clean energy. Learn about upcoming renewable energy projects.

Currently, the island is preparing a Molokai Community Energy Resilience Action Plan (CERAP): an independent, island-wide, community-led and expert-informed collaborative planning process to increase renewable energy on Molokai. The CERAP is being coordinated by the Molokai Clean Energy Hui by Sustainable Molokai. The Hawaiian Electric team is excited to provide technical support to the Molokai Clean Energy Hui in their planning process to develop a portfolio of clean energy projects to achieve 100% renewable energy for the island that is feasible, respectful of Molokai's culture and environment and strongly supported by the community. Learn more at sustainablemolokai.org/clean-energy.


Scenes from different Hawaiian islands

Community Engagement

Partnering with the Stakeholder Council, Working Groups, the Technical Advisory Panel and the broad public is essential to align our planning with statewide priorities and move Hawaii one step closer to a more equitable clean energy future.

We are grateful for the participation of community members across the islands since our planning began in 2019. We appreciate the opportunity to listen and collaborate with communities on potential solutions, and we value all the feedback we receive.

Sign up for email updates

We'll send you updates about our latest progress and opportunities to get involved.

Take our short survey

Help us better understand you and your energy needs by completing this short online survey.

Request a presentation for your organization

Invite us to give a short presentation and answer questions at your next community meeting or event.


We gather and consider two types of feedback throughout the IGP process:

  • Community: What are community members' visions and priorities for a clean energy future?

  • Technical: What needs to happen from scientific, engineering and economic perspectives to meet our carbon goals?

We appreciate the opportunity to listen to the community's concerns and collaborate with stakeholders on potential solutions, and we take all feedback seriously. However, there are instances in which we are unable to directly integrate all the input we receive into our decisions and recommendations. In those cases, we will follow up by sharing our reasoning for decisions and why we have chosen to integrate certain points.

We engage four groups in the IGP process:

  • Stakeholder Council with representatives from cities, each island, the state, partner agencies and developers. This group provides strategic guidance to Hawaiian Electric, and helps to ensure alignment with interests across the islands we serve.

  • Working groups that serve in an advisory capacity. These specialized groups are focused on topics like social and economic resilience, transmission planning and the sourcing and evaluation of contractors.

  • Technical Advisory Panel with experts in energy technologies and engineering. This panel is an independent source of peer assessment.

  • The public, including customers and community members across the islands we serve. Public participation informs each step of our planning process.

These four groups are not working alone—there are many others outside the Hawaiian Electric IGP process who are involved in creating a clean energy future. These groups include policymakers and regulators (like the Public Utilities Commission), developers and community organizations.

We are grateful for community members' involvement since our planning began in 2019. Our team appreciates the opportunity to connect and collaborate with communities that we serve and of which we are a part. We committed to equitable, inclusive and transparent community engagement at each step of the planning process. This means:

Providing accessible and inclusive opportunities to engage
  • Offering multiple ways to engage, both online and in person
  • Hosting in-person meetings in familiar locations that are accessible by public transportation
  • Providing information in multiple languages and in formats that meet or exceed accessibility standards
Reaching out to and integrating feedback from people who are historically underserved
  • Prioritizing outreach to underserved and potentially most impacted communities, such as those closest to places where new energy projects may be located
  • Listening to community members' experiences, priorities and visions and using their feedback to shape planning outcomes
Being accountable for feedback we have received
  • Reviewing and considering public feedback as part of planning decisions, including where to locate new energy projects and grid infrastructure
  • Clearly communicating how community input shapes outcomes throughout the planning process through feedback loops

In 2022, you'll see invitations to share your thoughts online and in person about:

  • Locations for future energy projects
  • How best to involve your community in new project identification and development

We will use input from community members and technical experts to inform our recommendations to the Public Utilities Commission about these two topics.


Safety is our top priority!

Our outreach strategies will align with all local, state and federal guidelines for public health and safety.